Minimalism As A Lifestyle: Japanese Choose Simplicity And Modesty Over Materialism


In Japan, they reject materialism, and are trying to spend their time, money, and effort on things they truly enjoy.

In their homes, everything is diminished, airy and spacious, empty space, low tables dominate the room. No wonder that in Japan there is a trend to reject unnecessary things and keep only those that are truly needed.

Zen-buddhism encourages a desire for simplicity and in Japan there are many proponents of this philosophy. They follow that thought, among other things: Less is more.

There’s not a lot of things, but not a lot of space. And each thing has its place. Often, if a person lives alone, he has only one cutlery. And even in refrigerators, there’s not much food, perhaps just enough for one or two meals. Those are the limits of minimalism in Japan.

Of course, there is a practical reason: The smaller the apartment the more economic life. And since Japan is constantly faced with earthquakes, it is not wise to accumulate many valuable things in homes. Almost half of the damage from the earthquake was from the fallen items/objects. There is no hoarding, everything is in order, in homes there are only things you really use every day.

You will notice that everything is reduced, so it seems that the area in which they live is empty. It’s completely different from the Western culture, which is overloaded with housing objects/things. Even the absence of color is noticeable.

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